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A History of the Easter Egg

Happy Easter, uh, Eastar, everybody!

Foodimentary - National Food Holidays

Did you know that some European children still go door to door begging for Easter eggs just like American children do with candy on Halloween?  The practice is called pace-egging.

Easter falls in the spring, the yearly time of renewal, when the earth renews itself after a long, cold winter. The word Easter comes to us from the Norsemen’s Eostur, Eastar, Ostara, and Ostar, and the pagan goddess Eostre, all of which involve the season of the growing sun and new birth. The Easter Bunny arose originally as a symbol of fertility, due to the rapid reproduction habits of the hare and rabbit.

The ancient Egyptians, Persians, Phoenicians, and Hindus all believed the world began with an enormous egg, thus the egg as a symbol of new life has been around for eons. The particulars may vary, but most cultures around the world use the egg as a symbol of…

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Writer, Walker, Entrepreneur, baby-boomer

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